Friday, 13 September 2019

Another ENT follow up, and a Chronic Vestibular Migraines diagnosis

Today, I had my second follow up with the ENT department. I saw the consultant himself this time, and he was a very pleasant man. He introduced himself and asked me to take a seat, before asking me how I'd been. I told him that things were pretty much the same as before. My balance hadn't improved, despite the physio exercises, and the dizziness and flashing lights/floaters were pretty much the same too.

He told me the results of my Vestibular tests were relatively normal, so he didn't think it was my ears that were affecting my balance etc. He said it was more of a "central" problem.


I found he took me seriously and was sympathetic to my struggles with my physical symptoms. I also told him my physio had told me to speak to the doctor about Vestibular Migraines. The consultant wholeheartedly agreed with him and gave me the formal diagnosis of Chronic Vestibular Migraines

I've included a link which explains what Vestibular Migraines actually are, but these are the symptoms I experience:


  • Dizziness: This tends to be all the time, but I do get acute bouts of dizziness where I feel as if I am going to fall over or faint
  • Balance Problems: Again, I feel like I'm going to fall over. It is the primary reason why I use a walking stick, and is a problem I've had for years. 
  • Flashing lights: This does what it says on the tin. They are flashing lights in my field of vision. They can be incredibly distracting and I cannot concentrate when there are lots at a time.
  • "Floaters": These are little shapes (wiggly lines is a typical one) in my field of vision. They float around then disappear
  • Sensitivity to light/sound: I don't always get this, but I have noticed it happen a lot recently.
  • Some nausea: This tends to come on with the acute bouts of dizziness
  • Migraine headaches: I do still get classic migraines (with the headache) now and again. As I've experienced classic migraines in the past, the ENT consultant says I am more susceptible to Vestibular ones now
Vestibular migraines don't typically occur with the classic type headache/s. The primary symptom tends to be dizziness, so it is not usual that someone would think they are having a migraine at the time.

After I'd explained my symptoms and the consultant had given me the diagnosis, he wanted to know what medication I take. I listed off the medication that I could remember, and he told me that some of the medication (namely the Tramadol) could be exacerbating the dizziness, as it works as a sedative. 

The next thing he suggested was to start by finding my triggers and exclude certain foods to see if they affect the migraine symptoms. He also wants to see me in about 3 or 4 months time


Overall, I'm very pleased with how the appointment went and how I was treated. Most things were discussed and at least I'm still under the care of ENT.

Do you suffer from Vestibular Migraines? Please comment below with what helps/makes them worse.


Resources

Vestibular Function Tests: https://www.stgeorges.nhs.uk/service/general-medicine/audiology/vestibular-balance-and-dizziness-service/vestibular-function-tests/

Vestibular Migraines: https://www.webmd.com/migraines-headaches/vestibular-migraines#1

Floaters and flashes in the eyes: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/floaters-and-flashes-in-the-eyes/


No comments:

Post a Comment